List Of Black Hat SEO Techniques To Avoid For Any Websites/Blogs

Discussion in 'Search Engine Optimization' started by borgninestallone, Nov 27, 2016.

  1. borgninestallone

    borgninestallone
    uix_expand uix_collapse
    Member

    Joined:
    Aug 28, 2012
    Messages:
    133
    Likes Received:
    8
    Here are list of Black Hat SEO Techniques to Avoid for any Webistes/Blogs. Google does not recommends these tactics and your website will be penalized as per Google's Algorithm.

    List of Black Hat SEO Techniques to Avoid for any Webistes/Blogs

    1. Unrelated Keywords

    Don't: Add irrelevant keywords to the copy for extra page hits.
    Example: "Kanye West would use our Dyson vacuum cleaners if he owned cats."

    2. Keyword Stacking and Keyword Stuffing

    Don't: Repeat keywords to the extent that it reads like gibberish in a sentence or image alt text.
    Example: "Picture frames picture frames pictures pictures pictures."

    3. Tiny Text, Hidden Text, and Hidden Links

    Don't: Put illegible text at the bottom of the page, make the text the same color as the background, or format text or images that are visually undetectable as links.
    Example: "This is a short sentence full of illegible gray text."

    4. Cloaking

    Don't: Present search engines with one set of content and site visitors with another, tricking visitors from search engines into experiencing a page of substantially different content.
    Example: A user searches for "happy octopus", clicks on a search result that appears to be about sea creature psychology, and is greeted with pornography.

    5. Doorway Pages or Gateway Pages

    Don't: Haphazardly stuff pages with keyword phrases with the primary goal of achieving a high ranking and then automatically redirect visitors to a separate page.
    Example: A page, filled with keyword phrases but little coherent content, that uses JavaScript or a meta refresh tag to redirect visitors to a separate and potentially unrelated page.

    6. Bait-and-Switch or Page Swapping

    Don't: Get a Web page indexed and ranked and then change the page entirely.
    Example: Clicking on a result in the SERP takes the user to a page that is completely different from the keywords used for searching and the description provided in the SERP.

    7. Duplicate Content or Mirror Site

    Don't: Copy a substantial amount of content from another website, with or without permission.
    Example: A website reprints an authoritative article found elsewhere to increase the number of visitors.

    8. Spam Blogs or Splogs

    Don't: Blog using software that generates garbled text with keyword phrases for the sole purpose of getting visitors to click on ads.
    Example: "Caffeinating the Mountain Dew with MSG is a summer treat safer than Guinness."

    9. Blog Spam or Comment Spam

    Don't: Automatically post links as comments on blogs to increase the number of inbound links.
    Example: "Great post! |3uy ch34p v14gr4 w1th fr33 5h199ing."

    10. Trackback Spam

    Don't: Abuse trackbacks with links to unrelated links on blogs.
    Example: "[…] randomized keyword phrases related keyword more random keywords […]"

    11. Spam Ping or Sping or PIngback Spam

    Don't: Notify ping servers of new content several times per minute to give the illusion that content is new.
    Example: Software that automates the process of notifying various ping servers of supposedly new content.

    12. Referrer Spam

    Don't: Advertise a website by making repeated requests using a fake referrer URL to websites that publicize referrer statistics.
    Example: Scripts that automatically follow links on illegitimate sites can land spam websites in publicized referrer logs.

    13. Link Farms

    Don't: Seek links from or link to sites with unrelated or low quality content in an attempt to improve visibility in the SERPs.
    Example: A long list of unrelated links and with supporting content can be found at pagehole.com.

    14. Cybersquatting or Domain Squatting

    Don't: Register a domain with a trademarked word in the name with the intent to profit off of the association.
    Example: juliaroberts.com was originally registered by Russell Boyd. It was later handed over to Julia Roberts after it was determined in court that Boyd "registered and used the domain name in bad faith".

    15. Typosquatting or URL Hijacking

    Don't: Register a domain name that is a misspelled version of a popular website or a competitor in an attempt to mislead visitors.
    Example: whitehouse.com may confuse users who intend to visit whitehouse.gov.

    16. Social Networking Spam

    Don't: Target demographics on social networking sites and message people with advertisements.
    Example: "Visit example.com to see pics of me and my friends [​IMG]."

    17. Cookie Stuffing or Cookie Dropping

    Don't: Stealthily place affiliate cookies on computers.
    Example: A spammer inserts a URL to a fake image on a message board that puts affiliate cookies on the computers of forum visitors.
     
  2. bangthetable

    bangthetable
    uix_expand uix_collapse
    Member

    Joined:
    Nov 17, 2016
    Messages:
    37
    Likes Received:
    3
    • Posting OFF page strategies on irrelevant website and very low quality websites
    • Posting more links on the same website such as bookmarking and web directories
    • Inserting more keywords on image alt tags and footers
     
  3. Ourbusinessladder

    Ourbusinessladder
    uix_expand uix_collapse
    Member

    Joined:
    Aug 19, 2016
    Messages:
    60
    Likes Received:
    1
    Links from irrelevant site or low PR site will also make to look as spam.
     
  4. fisicx

    fisicx
    uix_expand uix_collapse
    Active Member
    Community Liaison 1.0

    Joined:
    Mar 3, 2016
    Messages:
    2,414
    Likes Received:
    203
    No they won't. Links can come from all sorts of places, you have no control on who links and from where. Ignore PR - it isn't supported by Google anymore so has no value at all.
     
  5. rf-harris

    rf-harris
    uix_expand uix_collapse
    Member

    Joined:
    Jan 6, 2016
    Messages:
    334
    Likes Received:
    34
    concentrate more on your on site SEO as you will have full control over it. Anybody can build links to your website and if you have bad backlinks with good content on your website and good on page SEO you are very likely to be doing good in terms of your search engine rankings.
     
  6. Ourbusinessladder

    Ourbusinessladder
    uix_expand uix_collapse
    Member

    Joined:
    Aug 19, 2016
    Messages:
    60
    Likes Received:
    1
    Are you saying links from low-quality sites won't hurt !!
     
  7. Ourbusinessladder

    Ourbusinessladder
    uix_expand uix_collapse
    Member

    Joined:
    Aug 19, 2016
    Messages:
    60
    Likes Received:
    1
    yes, disavowing the bad backlinks are important...
     
  8. rf-harris

    rf-harris
    uix_expand uix_collapse
    Member

    Joined:
    Jan 6, 2016
    Messages:
    334
    Likes Received:
    34
    They do hurt but if you have good on page SEO and content, it will help to reduce the bad affect of these low quality backlinks. Google understand that you are not totally in command of all of your website's backlinks so if you have some bad backlinks with many high quality backlinks, you are most likely to be doing fine but if you only have low quality and bad backlinks then they would certainly cause you problems.
     
  9. fisicx

    fisicx
    uix_expand uix_collapse
    Active Member
    Community Liaison 1.0

    Joined:
    Mar 3, 2016
    Messages:
    2,414
    Likes Received:
    203
    It depends on how they were created. If a chap making shoes in Bolton likes something you wrote about an iphone in Singapore and links to your site there is no harm at all. But if you pay someone $100 to build links and they do this on a load of spammy sites then Google will probably just ignore them. Do this a lot and Google might give you a penalty.

    Most links from low quality sites are just ignored by the search engines. As are a lot of links from supposed high quality sites.
     
  10. fisicx

    fisicx
    uix_expand uix_collapse
    Active Member
    Community Liaison 1.0

    Joined:
    Mar 3, 2016
    Messages:
    2,414
    Likes Received:
    203
    Nope. Don't do this. Disavowing links can seriously harm your ranking. Disavowing links can alert Google to your site and results in an investigation which can cause your ranking to drop.

    In any case, there is now a long backlog so Google might never get round to investigating these links.
     
  11. Ourbusinessladder

    Ourbusinessladder
    uix_expand uix_collapse
    Member

    Joined:
    Aug 19, 2016
    Messages:
    60
    Likes Received:
    1
    then what to be done, when we have links from low-quality sites.
     
  12. fisicx

    fisicx
    uix_expand uix_collapse
    Active Member
    Community Liaison 1.0

    Joined:
    Mar 3, 2016
    Messages:
    2,414
    Likes Received:
    203
    Did you create them yourself (or pay someone to create them)? If so just go back and ask for them to be removed.

    Or just ignore them and move on. Link building is so full of pitfalls and traps it's best not to do it at all unless you have the budget to pay for it to be done properly.
     
  13. Joseph.Shivell

    Joseph.Shivell
    uix_expand uix_collapse
    Active Member

    Joined:
    Oct 8, 2009
    Messages:
    2,659
    Likes Received:
    861
    I have seen some cases where someone asks how to get rid of low-quality or spammy links, and they are told something like "no problem just use Google's Disavow Tool". That is not what the Disavow Tool is for, and it's probably why the backlog is so long. As fisicx said in the last post, go back to the person who created the link and ask to have it removed, and document what you have done. If you have tried, and failed, to have the links removed, only then should you use the Disavow Tool. When you do, Google will ask for documentation, and will then decide whether to disavow the links. You can also, as rf-harris suggested, create more high-quality links on your own, if you know what you are doing. If not, you may be better off hiring an SEO professional(not a so-called professional link builder) to market your website for you. It may seem expensive, but only if it's done wrong and someone has to clean up the mess. If it's done right, it's an investment that makes you more than you invest.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  14. joy.linford

    joy.linford
    uix_expand uix_collapse
    Member

    Joined:
    Dec 9, 2013
    Messages:
    107
    Likes Received:
    5
    You may add keyword stuffing and buy backlink in your list. Putting targeted keyword multiple time in the web page violate Google guidelines.
     
  15. fisicx

    fisicx
    uix_expand uix_collapse
    Active Member
    Community Liaison 1.0

    Joined:
    Mar 3, 2016
    Messages:
    2,414
    Likes Received:
    203
    Nothing wrong with buying backlinks. Google does it all the time: it's called adwords. And you can pay people for links, Google says this is OK. What isn't OK is buying links in order to boost ranking.
    This doesn't violate Google's guidelines. It might not be good SEO but it isn't black hat SEO.
     
  16. Joseph.Shivell

    Joseph.Shivell
    uix_expand uix_collapse
    Active Member

    Joined:
    Oct 8, 2009
    Messages:
    2,659
    Likes Received:
    861
    No, it's not. Adwords is Google's name for their sponsored ads program, which places ads in the SERPs and on partner sites. The purpose of Adwords, as the name implies, is to advertise a website selling a product or service. Calling it "buying backlinks" is, at best, playing word games. At worst, it's an attempt to justify an unethical practice. When most people talk about "buying backlinks", that's exactly what they mean. They are paying someone to provide links to their website, regardless of where they come from. The provider then places links all over the place, with no regard to quality or relevance of the source.

    According to Google's own guidelines, link schemes include "Buying or selling links that pass PageRank. This includes exchanging money for links". Of course, since this was written, the PageRank normally included in the toolbar has been discontinued, so we can substitute "link juice" for "PageRank", and we find that Google does not say to "pay people for links" is okay. Whether you use "PageRank" or 'link juice", you're still "buying links in order to boost ranking", so your other statement is more accurate.
     
  17. fisicx

    fisicx
    uix_expand uix_collapse
    Active Member
    Community Liaison 1.0

    Joined:
    Mar 3, 2016
    Messages:
    2,414
    Likes Received:
    203
    I agree that TBPR has gone but PageRank is still very much alive and relevant. Linkjuice on the other hand is just a made up Moz thing and isn't a ranking signal in any shape or form.

    I buy all sorts of links. They bring me targeted traffic that then converts so it's good for me. Google doesn't seem to mind as my ranking is as good as it always was. People get too excited about the minutae of links, there is no need, just be sensible about what you do and don't fret over the things you can't control.
     
  18. Joseph.Shivell

    Joseph.Shivell
    uix_expand uix_collapse
    Active Member

    Joined:
    Oct 8, 2009
    Messages:
    2,659
    Likes Received:
    861
    I have heard and seen many people refer to "link juice" when speaking or writing about how links help website rankings. I have never heard it referred to as "Linkjuice", as Moz did with "Domain Authority" vs "domain authority" as a ranking signal(the difference has already been explained in another thread, so will not be discussed here). If they did indeed use it as another "made up thing", then you could be correct. In that case, "Linkjuice" doesn't matter, but "link juice" does.

    If you use them as a traffic generator, and the traffic they bring you converts, that's fine. If you are talking about rankings, however, one of the sites in your signature doesn't seem to be doing to well. Another, that you admit is "just a hobby", does have a few top tens, but none in the number one position. The third deals with a single, specific product, so the number of related keywords is too small. If you're okay with the results you're getting, whether you want to better is up to you. There are many others, however, who do not have the rankings, or traffic, they need because of low quality links and black hat techniques. For them it's a problem that needs to be fixed
     
  19. fisicx

    fisicx
    uix_expand uix_collapse
    Active Member
    Community Liaison 1.0

    Joined:
    Mar 3, 2016
    Messages:
    2,414
    Likes Received:
    203
    Joseph, your post feels like an personal attack on my business model. You have no idea about how I market the sites so to make claims about ranking is disingenuous. The 'hobby' site earns me over $100/day and the third site has just landed me a $2000+ contract with a loan company.

    There is nothing wrong with buying links. What is wrong and can get you into trouble is buying links in order to boost ranking. And even then it's not black has as @joy.linford suggested.

    Link juice = linkjuice. It's a moz thing, they were the ones who invented the term (but pretend not to): https://www.woorank.com/en/edu/seo-guides/link-juice
     

Share This Page