Windows 8 features

Discussion in 'Computer Questions, Issues & Security' started by acharya25, Aug 2, 2013.

  1. acharya25

    acharya25
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    Language and standards support


    Snap feature: Xbox Music app, along Photos app snapped into a sidebar to the right side of the screen
    Windows 8 allows the use of a new platform, the Windows Runtime (WinRT), to create a new type of application that runs in a secure sandbox, and facilitate easier sharing of data between them, or snap to the side of a widescreen display for multi-tasking. WinRT, being a COM-based API, allows for the use of various programming languages to code apps, including C++, C++/CX, C#, Visual Basic .NET, or HTML5 and JavaScript.
    The new platform is primarily designed for 16:9 aspect ratio screens, with 1366×768 and larger resolution screens able to display no more than two such applications side-by-side, with one occupying most of the screen and one "snapped" to one side. 1024×768 screens can display one application in full-screen, and 1024×600 screens can only use the traditional desktop applications.
    Previously referred to as "Metro-style apps", connecting it to Windows 8's use of an interface following the Metro design language as its primary desktop, reports surfaced that Microsoft employees were told to stop using the term due to potential trademark issues with an unspecified partner. A Microsoft spokesperson however, denied these reports and stated that "Metro-style" was merely a codename for the new application platform.
    Windows 8 also introduces APIs to support near field communication (NFC) on Windows 8 devices, allowing functionality like launching URLs/applications and sharing of information between devices via NFC.
    Windows Store[edit]
    Main article: Windows Store
    Windows Store is a digital distribution platform built into Windows 8, which in a manner similar to Apple's App Store and Google Play, allows for the distribution and purchase of apps designed for Windows 8. Developers will still be able to advertise desktop software through Windows Store as well. To ensure that they are secure and of a high quality, Windows Store will be the only means of distributing WinRT-based apps for consumer-oriented versions of Windows 8.
    Shell and user interface[edit]



    Windows 8's lock screen


    Windows 8 displaying the multi-monitor taskbar (in "Duplicated on all taskbars" mode)
    Windows 8 features a redesigned user interface built upon the Metro design language, with optimizations for touchscreens. The Start screen (which resembles the home screen of Windows Phone) serves as the primary method of launching applications, and is shown in place of the desktop on startup. The Start screen consists of a grid of tiles which can be arranged into columnar groups. Tiles for apps can be either small (taking up 1 square) or large (taking up 2) in size. They can display dynamic content provided by their corresponding apps.
    Metro-style apps on Windows 8 use Windows Runtime and run full-screen. On displays larger than 1366×768, apps can be snapped to the side of the screen, enabling multi-tasking. Users can switch between apps and the desktop by clicking on the top left corner or swiping the left side of the touchscreen to invoke a sidebar that displays all currently opened Metro-style apps. The traditional desktop is accessible from a tile on the Start screen, or by launching a desktop app. Alt+Tab ↹ key combination toggles between apps regardless of their type (Metro-style vs. traditional).
    The interface also incorporates a taskbar on the right side of the screen known as "the charms" (lowercase), which can be accessed from any app or the desktop by sliding from the right edge of a touchscreen or compatible trackpad, moving the mouse cursor to one of the right corners of the screen, or pressing ⊞ Win+C. The charms include Search, Share, Start, Devices and Settings charms. The Start charm invokes or dismisses the Start screen. Other charms invoke context-sensitive sidebars that can be used to access app and system functionality.
    User login[edit]
    Windows 8 features a new lock screen, which includes a date and time display, along with the ability to display notifications from apps. Two new login methods optimized for touch screens are also available, including a four-digit PIN, or a "picture password"; which users allow the use of certain gestures performed on a selected picture to login. These gestures will take into account the shape, the start and end points, as well as the direction. However, the shapes and gestures are limited to tapping and tracing a line or circle. Microsoft found that limiting the gestures improved the speed of sign-ins by three times compared to allowing freeform methods. Wrong gestures will always deny a login, and it will lock out the PC after five unsuccessful attempts, until a text password is provided.
    Microsoft account integration[edit]
    User accounts can be linked to a Microsoft account to provide additional functionality, such as the synchronization of user data, and integration with other Microsoft services such as Xbox Live, Xbox Music, Xbox Video (for gaming and multimedia) and SkyDrive online file storage.
    Multi-monitor support[edit]
    Windows 8 also includes improved support for multi-monitor configurations; the taskbar can now be shown on multiple displays, and each display can also show its own dedicated taskbar. Wallpapers can also be spanned across multiple displays, or each display can have its own separate wallpaper.
    File Explorer[edit]
    Windows Explorer, which has been renamed File Explorer, now incorporates a ribbon toolbar, designed to bring forward the most commonly used commands for easy access. The "Up" button (which advances the user back a level in the folder hierarchy) that was removed from Explorer after Windows XP has also been restored.[11Additionally, File Explorer features a redesigned preview pane that takes advantage of widescreen layouts.File Explorer also provides a built-in function for mounting ISO, IMG, and VHD files as virtual drives.
    Progress windows for file operations have also been redesigned; offering the ability to show multiple operations at once, a graph for tracking transfer speeds, and the ability to pause and resume a file transfer. A new interface has also been introduced for managing file name collisions in a file operation, allowing users to easily control which conflicting files are copied.
    Windows 8 allows users to remove the Favorites hierarchy from File Explorer's navigation pane through Folder Options dialog box.
    Libraries, introduced in Windows 7, can now have their individual icons changed through the user interface.Previously, users had to change icons manually by editing configuration files.
    Internet Explorer[edit]
    Windows 8 ships with Internet Explorer 10, which can run as either a desktop program (where it operates similarly to Internet Explorer 9), or as an app with a new full-screen interface optimized for use on touchscreens. Internet Explorer 10 also contains an integrated version of Flash Player, which will be available in full on the desktop, and in a limited form within the "Metro" app.
    Task Manager[edit]


    The new task manager in Windows 8 offers a detailed look at how system resources are being used
    Windows 8 includes an overhauled version of Task Manager, which features the following changes:[18]
    Task Manager defaults to a simple view which only displays a list of computer programs with a window. The expanded view is an updated version of the previous Task Managers with several tabs.
    Resource utilization in the Processes tab is shown using a heat map, with darker shades of yellow representing heavier use.
    The Performance tab is split into CPU, memory, disk, Ethernet, and wireless network (if applicable) sections. There are overall graphs for each, and clicking on one reaches details for that particular resource
    The CPU tab no longer displays individual graphs for every logical processor on the system by default. It may show data for each NUMA node.
    The CPU tab displays simple percentages on heat-mapping tiles to display utilization for systems with many (64 or more, up to 640) logical processors. The color used for these heat maps is blue, with darker color again indicating heavier utilization
    Hovering the cursor over any logical processor's graph shows the NUMA node of that processor and its ID.
    The new Startup tab lists startup programs and their impact on boot time. Windows Vista included a feature to manage startup applications that was removed in Windows 7.
    The Processes tab now lists application names, application status, and overall usage data for CPU, memory, hard disk, and network resources for each process.
    Task manager recognizes when a Windows Runtime application is in "Suspended" status.
    The normal process information found in the older Task Manager can be found in the Details tab.
    Family Safety
    Windows 8 integrates Windows Live Family Safety into the operating system, allowing parents to restrict user activity through via web filtering, application restriction, and computer usage time limits. Parental controls functionality, introduced in Windows Vista, was previously partially removed in Windows 7 and made a part of Windows Live Family Safety instead.
    Infrastructure
     
  2. kevinkrieger

    kevinkrieger
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    Awesome features!! I love the way windows 8 looks.
     
  3. bmwillsmith

    bmwillsmith
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    Personally i like the apps like Skype and online ticket booking are awesome in windows 8 which makes our work easy.
     
  4. TimeRider

    TimeRider
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    Actually I like the boot time of Windows 8 which is actually fast. It loads fast and response in good time. Windows 8 is stable for me and working good. It only crashes few times.
     
  5. MasterA

    MasterA
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    Window 8 is great. I love it.
     
  6. bjdea2

    bjdea2
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    I'm glad to see people loving Windows 8. We need microsoft to come back stronger again to stop Apple from becoming to dominant. Competition is always good the end consumer.
     
  7. Aiplabro

    Aiplabro
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    Windows 8 is good but i like windows 7.......
     
  8. geeksonrepair

    geeksonrepair
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    Here some features of window 8:
    1)You can find or easily search any features.
    2)Window 8 allow to recover or reset your pc.
    3)Booting process is fast.
    4)Provide better security.
     

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