When do you tell your boss a co-worker is looking for a new job???

Discussion in 'Employer Issues' started by Heather Force, Oct 19, 2011.

  1. Heather Force

    Heather Force
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    Looking for some helpful advice regarding a sticky professional situation - Almost 6 months ago my boss told me he would like to expand the business and hire someone to assist me and work second shift. He wanted my input on the decision as to what kind of person I would want/need and wanted to let me know what other areas the person would be expected to help out in. With the economy what it is, I know several people who are out of work, as much of our industry (graphic design) is being farmed out over seas. One friend and former co-worker of 7+ years, "Jane," had been out of steady work for a while. Knowing how well we had worked together in the past, I mentioned to my boss that I would like to ask her to apply for the position. My boss immediately asked for more information about her, what my thoughts were on her suitability for the position and how well I thought she would fit into our tight knit group. I told him that I thought this would be a good match. After a quick chat and tour of our offices, Jane was hired on little more than my recommendation. Now almost 6 months later, I have noticed a large change in her level of professionalism and tact since we had last worked together. She has made constant unpleasant comments about my boss and other co-workers, as well as some of our clients. Recently she made a negative comment directly to my boss about how he micro-manages things, in her opinion. He was a better person than me, and walked away. She immediately told me what had been said and since she didn't think this job was worth anything anyway, she was going to start looking for better employment immediately. After having facilitated her entrance into the company, I feel responsible for any issues she may have already created or will create in the future. I am worried that she may get frustrated and quit abruptly, or will not give full notice if/when she finds other employment.
    What are your thoughts on passing on the information I have to my boss? Also any opinions on passing on my support of reprimanding her (up to and including termination) for her disrespectful and unprofessional behavior. I worry that my boss would overlook some of her behavior due to her friendship with me. Please help!
     
  2. BODHost

    BODHost
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    Be professional and stay cool. First of all communicate with your friend and discuss some issues. Ask her what kind of problems she is facing in workplace environment. If something going wrong with her in workplace, then set her meeting with HR. If everything is OK, but she is just egoistic, then tell your boss everything frankly.

    According my experience sometimes people don't like to admit they need help. Be prepared, of course, your friend might turn out to be a unresponsive about problems while discussion ….but again, you'll never know unless you try.*You will recover the situation once you communicate with her.
     
  3. daytrader

    daytrader
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    it appears that you don't know your friend very well. like what BODhost said, talk to her about how you feel too.
    also assume your boss already have felt your friend's guts.
     
  4. Gary Barzel

    Gary Barzel
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    First I would sit down with your friend as already mentioned and try to see if something is bothering her, and if there is anything you can do to help out. Ask her if she is having any difficulties adjusting to the job, or if there it's not the type of job she envisioned. You can also tell her gently that the type of behavior she exhibited has no place in an office, and if she has complaints in the future she can do it in a more professional manner where chances are she will be heard. I would then sit down with your boss and communicate your thoughts with regard to your co-worker. Being that your boss trusted you with finding a new employee you don't want it to reflect upon your ability to do that in the future. Explain to your boss that the person you hired is not the same person with whom you have worked previously, and that you have spoken to her about her behavior and you hope it won't happen again.
     

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