Verbal Crutches

Discussion in 'Self Improvement and Being Successful' started by howdoi, Aug 3, 2010.

  1. howdoi

    howdoi
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    I have two words for those that are so worried about saying "um", "like", "you know" etc when speaking in public:

    Who Cares.

    Yes! I know! Normally when there is a problem, the only solution is to make more rules in an attempt to deal with the issue. In this case, we can fall back on the tried and true method of not caring. It's fun and easy to do!

    Remember, the only thing you are responsible for is to Deliver Information. That's it.

    You can say that a person who says "ummm" too many times is not being an effective speaker. And if every second word is "umm" then you'd be right.

    But if during the course of a 30 minute speech, you say umm or like a few times, then what's the big deal?

    Try this. Watch any given news segment. Local, CNN, it doesn't matter. I can almost guarantee that those announcers and hosts will use these so called verbal crutches while telling you about the latest tragedy in their part of the world. Now ask yourself, how much did it take away from me being able to glean the gist of their story? You probably didn't even notice.

    This will be true for your audiences as well. All they want is to have you tell them a story. Saying Like or You Know won't detract from that story.

    What you should focus on instead:

    Know the topic
    Know the audience
    Prepare and Practice

    You'll do fine.

    (orig. published Aug 3, publicspeakingpc.blogspot.com)
     
  2. youngkia1

    youngkia1
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    Nice point of view, but on the contrary saying "umm, ahh, like etc"is not good habit. Why? I have a friend, he's working as call center agent, according to him saying "umm, ahh, like etc. is not putting a good impression on their job, they are sounded not know what they are doing that is why they are not allowed to say those words. They have a term for that, they called it "fillers". Filling words to those gap seconds.
     
    #2 youngkia1, Aug 3, 2010
    Last edited: Aug 3, 2010
  3. howdoi

    howdoi
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    I agree that the habit itself may not be a good one, but if I had to choose between getting the information out to the listener, or getting nervous and worrying about a few filler words, I'd choose the former. Once you get used to speaking, you can focus on your speech patterns and habits. That's my personal approach.

    I suppose that if someone wanted, they could always fill the gaps with silence instead, but it depends on the person. Not talking is sometimes a good thing!
     
  4. Fergal

    Fergal
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    howdoi, I'd agree that the odd "umm", "emmm" or "you know" doesn't do any harm. But when they are over used it sounds annoying and unprofessional. If you listen to experienced TV or radio people, they tend to use those crutch words, a lot less than people who have very little experience of public speaking.
     

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