Should I tell my marketing client to let me handle his online presence?

Discussion in 'Internet Marketing' started by goats, Jun 10, 2014.

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  1. goats

    goats
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    Hello,

    I am new to this forum, but I signed up because of this question.

    I work for a small and local SEO, marketing, and web design company. Sometimes, our clients ask us to set up/run their social media pages for them (that's what I do). We recently acquired a new business owner who asked for just that. He had an existing Facebook page which had 9 likes, and the last post was from December. I organized a social media plan for him, and after his approval, started working on vamping up his business page - this was about a week ago. Today, I checked the page to see that there were over 1,200 likes. He had also deleted every single one of his posts, including the few that I had posted. I'm assuming those likes were bought, and therefore they are probably from fake accounts. I know this is only going to hurt his business. No one is engaged on his page, and only a handful of people are even seeing his posts in their newsfeed.

    Note: My small company has a Facebook page with a measly 90 or so likes. But we have plenty of likes and comments on everything we post. And with Facebook-specific promotions, we know our followers are contributing to our business.

    Should I (politely) tell this guy to stop messing around with the Facebook page? Should I ask him if he has an issue with my social media plan he approved last week? I could talk to my boss, but he doesn't handle this side of the business and typically likes me to do all of it on my own. I just need some advice. Thanks in advance.
     
  2. ConsultJoseph

    ConsultJoseph
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    Let's talk about the client first, did he hire you/your company for consulting on social media? Or to work on his social media marketing? Because if it's the latter, he is clearly not getting the process for 2 probable reasons: 1. You did not explain fully what you will do and the expected results and that is the reason why he is getting impatient and bought fake likes 2. He doesn't like your posts and don't think it is going to work so he took the matters into his own hands.

    I suggest you set a meeting with a client and explain stuff to him, include the disadvantages of buying fake likes, etc.

    As for your boss, it depends on what kind of boss he is. Is he annoyed if you talk to him about your problems? Or is a helpful guy who lends an ear as well as shares what he thinks? You be the judge.

    As for me, I think the problem here is communication. Whether you lack communication on updating the client or the client simply has a habit of being impatient in online marketing. However, 1,200 likes isn't too big. It's actually helpful to have on the standpoint of branding because when real clients see the page having less than 5 likes, it will send bad vibes to potential clients.
     
  3. Joseph.Shivell

    Joseph.Shivell
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    We once had a client who re-designed his entire website while an SEO campaign was in process, and when his rankings dropped, he asked us why our techniques were not working. I have seen posts in this forum from people who say they want a certain number of "likes" in a specified amount of time, and others who want a certain amount of visitors in a specified period of time.
    I agree with ConsultJoseph, the problem is communication. You have to explain to the client exactly how the process works, and sometimes you have to be very patient with them. All the client knows is what they want, and it is up to the service provider to let them know what is and isn't possible. You have to let the client know what will happen if he does not "stop messing around with (his) Facebook page", and you do sometimes have to be brutally honest, but polite (don't actually say "messing around"). You may also have to be direct about the consequences should he continue to "mess around", including, if necessary, severing ties with him.
     
    #3 Joseph.Shivell, Jun 11, 2014
    Last edited: Jun 11, 2014
  4. Chris_Tax

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    You work for him. You need to talk with him. Explain your marketing plan. tell him the cost for your time etc. People respect the truth. He has to understand Facebook is a a hard nut to crack.
     
  5. Tim1

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    I think that because you do work for him, you need to discuss what is going on and let him know WHY (this is the important part) what is he is doing is only going to come back and bite him later. He has the right to do what he wants, but anyone with half a brain will listen to your explanation.
     
  6. goats

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    Thanks, everyone, for your thoughts. Per your advice, I have scheduled a phone meeting with him to touch base and make sure everything goes smoothly in the future. Anyway, here's a followup:

    The guy said he didn't know what to do with his Facebook and needed someone to run it for him. Usually, this means the client doesn't want to be/shouldn't be involved with their page until we "clean it up", but that's not something I clarify beforehand. Of course I will mention it for all future cases. And I was pretty clear about what types of posts I would be making. He could have just changed his mind.

    My boss isn't necessarily annoyed with me when I bring up problems. He's just pretty overwhelmed - he's the only coder at this company, so he's always busy.

    I agree, communication was definitely lacking here. I should have explained that we take over pages completely, and while we of course allow ideas and input, we like to be the ones posting (especially since have two opposite agendas does not work at all). Also, we need to be on the same page as far as what he's paying for. At this point, it's almost like he's wasting money. I will make sure everything is crystal clear in the future.

    Again, thanks. At the least, this has helped me better my company's relationships to clients in the future.
     
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