Resigning but Offering Consulting?

Discussion in 'Starting a Business' started by Rikaelus, Apr 28, 2013.

  1. Rikaelus

    Rikaelus
    uix_expand uix_collapse
    New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 28, 2013
    Messages:
    5
    Likes Received:
    1
    In the near future I'll likely be leaving my current employer of 9 years and will likely be giving just the normal 2 week notice. However, I have unique knowledge gathered over those years and am the sole supporter of various legacy and current critical internal applications. Simply put, there's no way for me to leave in two weeks and not make others' lives difficult, and I don't want to burn any bridges by doing so.

    That said, I began to consider offering myself as an after-hours consulting resource, negotiating an hourly rate and firmly defining my availability so it wouldn't interfere with my new employment; only after-hours/weekends and probably a 10-hour/week limit. And naturally I'd verify with my new employer that this isn't an issue prior to offering it. Given that my existing duties, while critical, fell far short of requiring a full time schedule, this might even be considered a more cost-effective way for them to retain my knowledge and skill set for when it's needed.

    Another unique characteristic of my situation is that my new employment is currently slated as a 6 month contract, and while the company is renown for converting contract to salary employment, if that doesn't happen I might well be in a position to return to my previous employer. Part of the reason for my departure is because a project I was managing has been put on hold until at least 2014--they could need me more in 6 months than they do even now.

    I've read that this can be a troublesome proposition but I'd really like to mitigate the damage done by my departure, and especially since there's nobody else currently with the company with the skill set to quickly take over what I've worked on and the various processes I've become a part of over the course of nearly a decade. And it seems like remaining a resource--if even just for emergency support--will keep me in touch and help prevent any bridges from being burned.

    Given my situation, opinions?

    Thanks in advance
     
  2. Business Attorney

    Business Attorney
    uix_expand uix_collapse
    Premium Member
    Premium Member

    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2009
    Messages:
    604
    Likes Received:
    289
    The way you described your situation, offering your current employer an opportunity to continue to engage you as an independent contractor seems very reasonable. Of course, in order for that arrangement to work, it is imperative that both your duties to your new employer and your duties as an independent contractor to your old employer can coexist. It seems you have taken planned to care of that when you say that you will confirm with your new employer that the arrangement is acceptable and will carefully delineate the time that you are available in your understanding with your former employer.


    The principle danger that I see is that despite your careful plans to keep your two roles from conflicting with each other, one of the two employers will have needs that extend beyond the boundaries you have delineated. At that point, despite the fact that the employer with those needs has agreed to the boundaries, you may create hard feelings when you stick to the agreed-upon boundaries.


    I strongly suggest that you put the basic details in writing. It doesn't need to be particularly formal, although an agreement at least with your former employer on the independent contracting arrangement would be prudent. Unfortunately, parties to oral agreements frequently have very selective memories when it comes to recalling the details of their arrangement.
     
    • Like Like x 2
  3. Rocky

    Rocky
    uix_expand uix_collapse
    Member

    Joined:
    Nov 3, 2012
    Messages:
    675
    Likes Received:
    182
    Since you have already thought of all the necessary things that would come in picture when leaving your current job for another one, you should simply talk about the same with your current and prospective employer and make things clear.
    However, since you wish to offer consulting it is essential that you have a proper agreement about your responsibilities since you would be paid for the same so I suggest having an formal agreement would be the right way to go about it.
     
  4. Rikaelus

    Rikaelus
    uix_expand uix_collapse
    New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 28, 2013
    Messages:
    5
    Likes Received:
    1
    Thanks for the advice, guys.
    I'm not in my new job and have the consulting contract with my previous employer, and so far all has worked well.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  5. Fergal

    Fergal
    uix_expand uix_collapse
    Premium Member
    Premium Member

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2007
    Messages:
    10,575
    Likes Received:
    1,165
    Thanks for letting us know Rikaelus, glad to hear that everything is working out well for you.
     

Share This Page