Quitting Job under difficult circumstances

Discussion in 'Off Topic Discussion' started by Coffee85, Oct 22, 2012.

  1. Coffee85

    Coffee85
    uix_expand uix_collapse
    New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 22, 2012
    Messages:
    2
    Likes Received:
    0
    Hi

    I just wondered if I could trouble anyone for their opinion regarding a dilemma I am facing at the moment.

    Ok so I have been at my current job for 4 years, and have worked my way from starting life as a temp to being a Manager with my own team - there are only board level management structually higher than I am at the moment, and I have worked very hard to get where I am now.

    Our business is going through a lot of change at the moment, which will eventually result in a seperation from our parent company, a reduction in staff of around 50%, and a relocation c15miles away to where we're based at the moment. All this change will be announced in January, and is not common knowledge to the rest of the department. My manager has made it very clear I am in their long term plans, and that I have a future with them. This week several high profile redundancies in other areas of our business have been made, and the mood is unsettled, to say the least. My manager (soon to be joint owner of the company) has confided in me several times and expressed how they are really relying on my support over the coming months during very dofficult period, but the opportunities after this will be great once its all complete.

    So here's my dilemma - I have been offered another job. And it's one, that no matter what changes happen in my business, are pretty sure I would like to take - despite the 'opportunities' potentially avalable it will never match what this new role is offering. Apart from the 'normal' guilt from leaving a role, if I left now I would be leaving my manager and my department in a really hard situation. I am not irreplacable, but right now they need my support (there is not a 'ready made' replacement in the team for my role, and recruiting for now is out of the equation). My company have looked after me over the last few years, and the last thing I want to do is leave under a cloud. BUT this could be a really good opportunity for me. I am in a mangement position (non senior) and take my responsibilities of this role seriously.

    So what do I do? I am very loyal and dont want to leave under difficult situation, but at the same time I have to look after myself and take an opportunity thats been presented to me.

    Anyone else ever experienced resigning under difficult circumstances?
     
  2. daytrader

    daytrader
    uix_expand uix_collapse
    Active Member

    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2009
    Messages:
    1,678
    Likes Received:
    216
    I might just weigh my priorities if i were in your shoe.
     
  3. noreturn

    noreturn
    uix_expand uix_collapse
    Member

    Joined:
    Jul 12, 2012
    Messages:
    272
    Likes Received:
    45

    Weighing your options like ownedbox said may be the best thing, but they say to win big you have to play big. So maybe hanging in with the business for the next little bit might pay off. You didn't quite state what kind of business it is. So maybe the season is coming up or did it already pass? If it already pass you may have a hard time staying afloat during the off seasons. So maybe weighing some different options may be the route to go at this time. Get and employee that will work for minimum wage and take the other job that you have been offered. By the sounds of it, you have a lot of staff and if business isn't so swell maybe just get rid of some.
    \
    I couldn't tell if this was coming from the owner of the store or from a staff.. If it's from a staff member just remember how hard it can be for a business owner to run it, and if business isn't so hard and it's hard for them to stay afloat they only have two other choices and that is to either leave with what they got or lower what they got.. What I mean by that is they can either walk away with the money they got or go lower on their staff numbers and inventory or again sell it. With they way the ecomony is it's hard for business owners so just be mindful of whatever the owner wants to do.
     
  4. Deem Host

    Deem Host
    uix_expand uix_collapse
    Member

    Joined:
    Aug 6, 2012
    Messages:
    140
    Likes Received:
    2
    Yes that is a very difficult situation in your life if u have to quit your job for any reasons.
     
  5. Mark T

    Mark T
    uix_expand uix_collapse
    Active Member

    Joined:
    Dec 28, 2011
    Messages:
    1,201
    Likes Received:
    230

    Man, that is really a difficult situation. You sure do care much about the team you currently handle right? And don't seem to want them to be left behind with you getting a better opportunity. So what can you do? I'd say take a look at your own personal priorities [career aspect]. Are you willing to give up that opportunity just for the sake of handling your current team?

    You can still take the opportunity you have without leaving your time behind. Remain in contact if them especially if you have built better rapport with them during your leadership to them. If unluckily, either of them is out of the company, you can still make them feel better by helping them find some work jump to.

    If not, you can help in finding a replacement for you whom you can trust to take care of your team. Perhaps, you're in a higher management and this might even help you get in contact with them and improve their careers.

    The lesson: just don't forget where you came from. You never did it alone. You did it with the team, and without them you might not be currently where you are right now.
     
  6. Coffee85

    Coffee85
    uix_expand uix_collapse
    New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 22, 2012
    Messages:
    2
    Likes Received:
    0
    .

    Thanks for the advice
    Yeah you're right - I need to respect where I came from but I cant let it hold me back for the future
     
  7. D_J

    D_J
    uix_expand uix_collapse
    New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 16, 2012
    Messages:
    4
    Likes Received:
    0
    Think of it this way...if you weren't critical to the functioning of the business, your current company would drop you in an instant...just like they're doing with 50% of the staff.

    Guilt has no place in an employee/employer relationship. They will do what is best for their business. You should do what is best for you.

    However, ask yourself, if you tell you manager you're planning on leaving and he offers to double your salary until the transition is complete, would the other offer wait 3-6 months?
     

Share This Page