PHP Website Development

Discussion in 'Website Development & Design' started by Boby Smith, Jan 2, 2013.

  1. Boby Smith

    Boby Smith
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    My next project is developing a dynamic website in PHP. I have the idea and database schema figured out. I want to avoid writing redundant code, hence looking for a way to implement "User" registration,user home page etc directly(may be some framework or scripts directly). Using that i will add up my own functionality .

    PS:As this is going to be my first big php project, please do suggest me some IDE's to use.
     
  2. Fergal

    Fergal
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    I'm only just learning PHP and have used PSPad and Notepad++ for writing PHP code. They both worked pretty well for me. They are both easy to use and run very smoothly on my machine.
     
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  3. madelinekim

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    I agree with about information that notepad++ is one of the best tool for writing php code. Its really work good and we can easily write php code in it. There are so many of other php code editor tool available like dreamwear, notepad, PSPad etc. You can also use this tool for writing php coding.
     
  4. GeekGhost

    GeekGhost
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    Hands down notepad++ for me as well. Don't know how I got around without it.
     
  5. dgeneschi

    dgeneschi
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    If you haven't a strong reason for choosing PHP (for example, if you aren't writing a plugin for a popular CMS or forum engine that is written in PHP) you might want to give a second thought to whether it's the right tool to invest time in learning and working with. Web development has progressed a lot in the past several years. I've worked professionally with PHP and with more modern full stack frameworks in other languages, like the Rails framework (Ruby language) and Django (Python). Everything that's been said in pieces like http://www.codinghorror.com/blog/2012/06/the-php-singularity.html and http://me.veekun.com/blog/2012/04/09/php-a-fractal-of-bad-design is true -- it's a mess of a language. I feel that the only real justification for choosing PHP here in the year 2013 is if you are writing a WordPress plugin or Drupal module. For greenfield development, like creating a new web application from the ground up, it's likely worth investing time in learning a full stack framework in another language. Once you have a moderate grasp on the framework you choose you'll likely find yourself moving at least twice as fast and end up with a codebase that is more maintainable, flexible (Rails has built in schema migrations, for instance, for smoothly making schema changes as your project matures) with less redundant code and less boilerplate code. Also, you talk about not wanting to write boilerplate user management logic -- if you're working with a full stack framework, you can usually find drop-in modules (that are still deeply customizable) for things like this: ex: https://github.com/plataformatec/devise.
     

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