New sales position help PLEASE!!

Discussion in 'Growing and Managing a Business' started by slimbor, Jun 14, 2012.

  1. slimbor

    slimbor
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    Hello all,

    I will try to keep this as brief as possible. I hope to get as many opinions as possible to make my decision, so I'll give you a quick background.


    I've recently accepted a new sales position at a heavy construction equipment company. My previous experience has been in Operations Management and new Branch set ups. I decided to try my hand at a sales position as I have made a killing for previous employers by taking excellent care of the clientèle I've personally built up.

    In my interview, it was understood that my territory was new to the company (expansion) and there would be a branch opening under my supervision within "a couple months time". I had an agreement with the owner that I would review my standing with them in six months, and move closer to where the branch was to be built (1.5hrs away from home town). The only stipulation I really had, is that I was to have a branch within my territory to ensure that I could conveniently service customers. (I've previously grown 2 businesses successfully by reputation and referrals, and do as little cold calling as possible).

    I've currently been at this company for 4-4.5 months now and have seen no moves towards even purchasing a location in my territory. I've made every possible attempt in my power to get things moving. I've taken it upon myself after to months to line up with a commercial realtor. I've put together several proposals (different locations, prices, building etc.) and submitted them to my sales manager and the owner of the company. At about the 3 month mark, I wrote a proposal identifying what I have found within my territory (customer feedback, suggestions for improvement, market research, and what I felt were highly effective methods to gain market share). I sent an email requesting a meeting with the sales manager as well as the owner. I received a call from my sales manager who instructed me to email the info to him for review. I asked for a meeting for roughly a month, and got 0 feedback.

    2 weeks ago, I wrote my employer an email, expressing that customers will not deal with my due to our distant physical location. I explained that I have been asking for several months, for an indication of when to expect movement towards a branch, and have had 0 feedback from the owner or my manager. I asked to either be re-assigned to a different department until we are ready to pursue my territory effectively, or I suggested that I move on.

    My sales manager called me after being forwarded the email from my employer. We set up a meeting in my territory for the following day. He went on to explain to me that they have been recently acquiring a competitor and that my territory has been put on hold for the next 3-6 months. He then said that he spoke with the owner, and they wish for me to "hang in there" because this branch will be happening, and when it does, they hope for me to develop it. I've agreed to give it 3 months because, frankly I have yet to actively pursue other employment.

    For the last 2 weeks, my sales manager has talked to me more times in 1 day than he has for 3 months. He is pushing for me to get sales and keep cold calling so I don't remain bored.

    Here are my 2 major concerns:
    1. I directly explained in my interview that I do not wish to be a full time cold-calling sales man. I do understand that this is necessary in the industry, but it is not for me.

    2. I'm afraid of waiting too long and letting my reputation begin to fray. I'm pretty young still, and I know I can walk into a management position within my field at another employer. If I wait too long, I fear it will leave a bad spot on my resume.


    So finally, the question I ask is, do I stay or do I go? I cringe going out every morning for fear of cold calling because I view it as hurtful to this companies reputation at the current time. On the other hand, do I wait it out for the next 3-6 months and hopefully they follow through? Or are things just going to be this mis-leading from now on?
     
  2. slimbor

    slimbor
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    Sorry for the extremely long question. Please take a minute to scan through and give me your honest opinion.

    Thanks again for reading!
     
  3. daytrader

    daytrader
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    I'm not really into this, i'm not sure why it would leave a bad spot on your resume. but I think it took too long for your request. While you're in this situation, it may also be good to secretly look for another employer that can also offer managerial position.
     
    #3 daytrader, Jun 14, 2012
    Last edited: Jun 14, 2012
  4. slimbor

    slimbor
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    To explain better, when I've previously viewed candidates resumes for hiring, I would look at the durations of their recent employment. I never liked to see an employee that jumped around too often. I may have been too over critical in hiring though, but I had a good hiring track record.
     
  5. mvh

    mvh
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    What is your gut-feeling on this slimbor?
     
  6. MCDA CCG

    MCDA CCG
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    To me the bottom line is very simple. Life is about happiness, if you are not happy you need to leave. Circumstances change frequently with employers and there are times that you have to move on. Utilize a cover letter to communicate why you are looking for a new opportunity and what skills you can offer a new employer. If you are physically not close to a location and a new location is not being addressed, it seems to be a clear path. Do not over worry about a "bad spot" on your resume. If you need further advice please feel free to reach out.
     

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