new business advice - nursery business

Discussion in 'Starting a Business' started by beccawatson1, Jun 6, 2011.

  1. beccawatson1

    beccawatson1
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    Hello :)

    I've wanted to start a nursery since I was little and i'm finally going to turn that dream into a reality (most people who have kids are calling me crazy but hey ho!).

    I just wondered if anyone could help me out in the following areas:

    - how much will it cost (rent a place, advertising, employment etc)
    - what are the legal requirments i must meet?
    - what can i do to get business?
    - any unique personal affects i could put to my business to make it better than the local competition?


    any ideas, tips, friendly advice is very much appreciated! thank you :)
     
  2. sigma

    sigma
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    You gotta check them out by yourself, different location will give you different cost. Check the newspaper and you will get some rough idea about the cost

    Again, different country have different requirement. Some of the country dont have requirement but some need specified certification. You can actually check the requirement at the company registration department

    Advertising, tell your friends, use social media etc

    Basically people are looking on the service quality, professional level and price.
     
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  3. Stephen Ryan

    Stephen Ryan
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    It seems to me you might want to start small and grow to the big decisions you mentioned above.
    Have you thought about offering your services as a nanny to families in your area?
    Maybe for parents who have high flying jobs.
    Or maybe offer to look after a couple of children at your home for the day.
    You could talk to Business Link (UK) or your local chamber of commerce to find out how to start.
    Search on Google for agencies who offer nursery support.
    Its all out there, but as sigma says, you got to start doing some research
    Just don't run before you can walk (pun)... so too speak :)
    Stephen
     
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  4. Fergal

    Fergal
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    beccawatson1 would you mind please telling us what country or state your business would be based in?
     
  5. ecombiz1

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    If you have a green thumb, some space, a source of water, and a ton of ambition, you may want to try your hand at operating a plant nursery. This is not a guide to growing plants, as much as starting a business, since plant growing varies considerably from one area to another.

    1.Check the legal authorities in your location. There are several potential jurisdictions which may apply to your new business venture, and because they vary from place to place, you should do some research to see what regulations may apply to you. Here are some to think about:
    # Business license. If you intend to begin a commercial nursery business, this license is most likely required, and may have a fairly hefty cost associated with it.
    # Property zoning. For most areas in the U.S., zoning ordinances dictate possible uses for land. Normally, a nursey business would be considered "agricultural use", but in some interpretations, it might be "commercial", "agribusiness", or some other classification.
    # Look at the requirements for construction permits, if you are in an area where you will be required to build a green house, or you intend to build a storage building or warehouse for materials and equipment.
    # Check what insurance you will be required to carry on your business. This may include property hazard insurance, workman's compensation if you have paid employees, and general liability insurance if you expect visitors to your nursery.
    # Check the regulations governing growers in your area. In some places, you will be required to meet government agricultural inspection requirements.
    # Look at the availability of water for irrigation. Water mangagement authorities may have to issue seperate permits if you intend to install irrigation wells or draw water from a stream or lake.
    2.Investigate your potential market. You will need to be able to predict demand for your plants to be able to plan what you will grow. Here are some things to consider.
    # What plants you will grow. Nurseries produce plants for home gardens, landscaping, reforestation, and other uses. You will need to decide if you are going to produce container grown, bare root, or rootballed plant products.
    # Quantities. This is going to be a tricky subject. If you produce more plants than you can market effectively, you will be stuck with the surplus, and have to absorb the cost of your investment. Not enough is less financial burden, but being able to meet a customer's demand is essential in maintaining a good relationship with them.
    # Advertising. This is a cost almost all businesses must absorb to assure themselves a share of the market. Decide early what your advertising base will be, and budget funds in your business startup plan.
    Select a site for beginning your nursery. If you do not own land, you may have to lease or purchase a site for your business. Make sure it is suitable for your purpose, zoned appropriately, and will allow for growth as your business prospers. Also make sure your site has good access, particularly if you will be depending on customers coming to you for your product.

    Source: http://www.wikihow.com/Start-a-Plant-Nursery-Business
     
  6. Fergal

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    ecombiz1 I don't think that's the kind of nursery the Original Poster wants to start :)
     
  7. beccawatson1

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    i live in a small town in england :) thanks for all the replies they're very much appreciated
     
  8. spurs yeah

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    Are there any other nurseries in your town? Would there be a lot of customers to your nursery?
     
  9. Fergal

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    I'd suggest you need to start planning your costs using a draft of a business plan, to find that out. You might find the templates linked from the Business Plan Templates section of our Useful Business Resources / Links thread helpful. You don't necessarily need to complete the full plan, but spending some time on it will give you a lot of clarity.

    As regards costs I'd suggest the following;
    Rent - contact your local estate agents to ask them what properties are available and what the rent would be. Another option to consider, if it is practical for you, is the possibility of running the business from your home.
    Advertising - you can probably do a lot of that on a very low budget, get some leaflets printed (get quotes from local printers) and get them stuck up in local schools, post offices, supermarkets, etc.
    Employment - again have a look at your local newspaper recruitment section or recruitment website and look at what salaries other nurseries are advertising for their job vacancies.

    In Ireland the Health Service Executive (basically the government health board) regulates childcare facilities. Make a few phone calls, e.g. to your local health office, hospital, school, local authority, etc, to find out who is responsible for regulations in your area. If someone you call can't help you, ask them if they can perhaps suggest someone who can. If you spend some time doing this you will eventually find the right contact, once you do ask them about regulations and to please send you some info. One good thing about running a business in a government regulated environment, is that the government department responsible will often provide you with a booklet of their rules and regulations, which can be a very useful source of knowledge on how to set up and run your business.

    Have a look at your competitors and what they are offering, then try to think of ways that you could do it better and offer a higher quality of service to your clients. Ask people you know who use childcare about their experience - what are they happy with, what would they like to see improved, etc, etc.

    Please do let us know if you have any further questions.
     
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  10. td2011

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    Hi, how great that you are able to make your dream job a reality. Do a bit of research into the area you are most interested in setting up. With regards to competition you have in the area, can you offer something better and more to the needs of the local parents? Try to meet with some of them and make some plans, build up a good reputation with them.
     
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