Need help with clothing line manufacturers / design copyrights?

Discussion in 'Growing and Managing a Business' started by Keegan, Dec 12, 2012.

  1. Keegan

    Keegan
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    Alright, So it's already clear I'm on the road to starting up a business. I'm looking to go about this as less harmful as possible, When it comes to clothing lines and how they operate on an everyday schedule I know alot about. Tax's, online presence, all that. But when it comes to getting the shirt design up, what manufacturers to go to, To get the shirts printed or generally made. I have less then a clue. Some questions I have about the whole thing are as listed below. Thanks in advance!

    Questions!
    1. If I order a specific shirt design (size / fabric) that the company has already setup, And have my logo embroidered in the shirt, The shirt design (size / material used) isn't copy-written? *only asking this because I've seen some manufacturers selling van shoe look alikes (Same shape, color, just no logo), Just dont want to get a shipment of shirts, sell a ton of them, then have a lawyer from Japan at my doorstep.
    2. What is a good website to go to for legitimate and safe manufacturers?
    3. Who would I go to, to get a concept shirt done with? IE: Specify fabric, colours, logo placement, overall look, and final concept to send to the manufacturers?

    Thanks again to anyone who has any valid information on said topic, And if you need my location for any types of laws to watch for on the topic. I reside in Canada.:)
     
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  2. Business Attorney

    Business Attorney
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    I can't answer #2 or #3 but as for #1, unless there is something distinctive about the shirt design, there is no need to worry about copyright of the design of the shirt. Functional elements don't have the creative aspect that is necessary for a copyrighted work. That's why you can see so many legitimate knock-offs of clothing designs.

    If there are distinctive elements, you may have a problem with copyright or trademark. For example, putting three decorative stripes on a golf shoe might very easily violate the trademark of Adidas. Or putting a small polo player on a shirt might violate the Polo mark of Ralph Lauren.
     
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  3. BacklinksInc

    BacklinksInc
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    Any t-shirt printing company can do this. If you buy in bulk you will get cheaper rates, the only thing is comes down to is the images, you defiantly want to own the images or pay a designer to come up with the images and then sign the rights over to you. If you need more tips just pm me.
     
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  4. Keegan

    Keegan
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    Anything I get printed Il own the copyrights too, So it shouldn't be a problem @backlinksplus! Thank's both of you! Still open to any information on manufacturer finding websites, or any resources on it. :)

    -Keegan
     
  5. Fergal

    Fergal
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    Welcome to Business Advice Forum Keegan and thanks for posting your business questions.

    I'm sorry but I don't have experience in the textile business. However, when it comes to finding suppliers I'd suggest the following;

    • Do some searches on Google and in industry directives to find potential suppliers.
    • Look at those suppliers' websites, paying particular attention to any examples of work they have done before. This should allow you to quickly get a feel for which of them could potentially provide you with a quality service and which ones should be avoided.
    • Now that you have a smaller list, contact them either by phone or email with some questions regarding the services they provide and their pricing. You might also ask for client references and to see samples of their work. Again this will give you a good feel as to the companies you would be comfortable and confident working with.
    • If possible place a small order with the supplier you like best and see how it works out. If the supplier provides you with the quality and price you need you will probably work with them, if not you can try placing a sample order with one of the other suppliers on your short list.

    Good luck with it and please post back to let us know your thoughts and how you are getting on.
     

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