How do I approach my boss about leaving the company?

Discussion in 'Self Improvement and Being Successful' started by kessie_giddens, Jan 14, 2010.

  1. kessie_giddens

    kessie_giddens
    uix_expand uix_collapse
    New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 13, 2010
    Messages:
    2
    Likes Received:
    0
    I am currently the technical supervisor of a hospital laboratory. This is the first supervisor position I have held since graduating with my degree 5 years ago. Laboratory technologist is what my career is and has been, I went to college specifically for this type of work.

    I have been wanting to leave the medical field to pursue an education career, teaching and eventually specializing in learning disabilities.

    My manager is the type that is aggressive, she is always wanting me to take on more responsibilities and holds me to a very high standard. That I can handle and am ok with.

    I have really become very indifferent to this industry because I have seen a lot of behind-the-scenes stuff that has changed my perception of the field entirely. I really want to make the transition, but my manager is still pressing for me to take on more. Especially, now when we are incorporting some new instrumentation that requires travel to a training facility. I am her main choice to attend this training. I feel it is unfair for me to do this when I don't plan on being there past the summer.

    I do have some other issues outside of work that are also helping me make this decision, which she is somewhat aware.
    I have not broke this news to her, and have been trying to figure out how to tell her of my plans. I have already enrolled in an internet program to pursue the teaching career and only have about 6 months left to complete the program.
    I need feedback or advice on how to tell my manager of my change in direction, that I won't be here too much longer and that we need to find someone else to replace me. Plus, the issue of the instrument training, finding someone else to go instead of me.

    Any insight will be appreciated, I just need help on the approach and what to say since she is very aggressive in nature and can be very persuasive. Not one to take "NO" for an answer without a good explanation.
     
  2. seanstevens

    seanstevens
    uix_expand uix_collapse
    Member

    Joined:
    Jul 27, 2009
    Messages:
    638
    Likes Received:
    2
    Whatever the type of person your manager is I assume she has the ability to connect to other humans and not just act like a robot. This being the case you need to talk to her directly.

    You have a couple of choices (and this may depend on where you are and the terms of your contract);
    You say that you are looking to leave in around 6 months time, I will assume that you need the job until that time.

    Talk to her and tell her that you to pull back for a few months. You are really pleased with the responsibility that she is giving you, but you need a little time to sort out your "other issues" and would appreciate if you could delay any training / travels whilst you work through them.

    If you are not comfortable doing that then you might just have to go with the flow for the next 6 months, take on the extra work / responsibility until you are ready to move on.

    You will need to be careful about saying anything now about wanting to leave otherwise she may instruct the company to start the process to push you from the company now.
     
  3. Fergal

    Fergal
    uix_expand uix_collapse
    Premium Member
    Premium Member

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2007
    Messages:
    10,578
    Likes Received:
    1,163
    Welcome to our community kessie_giddens and thanks for posting your questions. Many of us have had the misfortune to work for a difficult boss at one time or another and it is not a nice position to be in.

    Although it is not easy to deal with now, the fact that your boss always selects you to attend the training is probably a compliment to your skills and a mark of respect that you have the ability to take the details on board and bring the knowledge back to your colleagues. This may actually be an indication that you are suited to a role in teaching and perhaps you may be able to look at the situation in a more positive light, if you bear this in mind.

    I'd agree with Sean that it will probably not help your situation, to tell your boss that you are planning to leave. If she knows that you are thinking of leaving she may well start trying to replace you straight away.

    Overall I would say that you should try to look at your job more positively and try to enjoy it more while you are there, keep working on your online training and plan the actions you need to take to get a teaching job in your chosen field.

    It might also help you to look at the situation from your bosses point of you and to understand where she is coming from. She may find her own job difficult and be in a situation where she has to juggle a lot of responsibilities to keep the lab running smoothly. I don't say this to justify her aggressive approach, however it may make your life a little easier if you can begin to see things from her perspective. Instead of looking at the negatives of how you are being managed, try to focus on thinking of ways that you can help to make the situation better. This type of approach could make your last few months there, much more bearable and productive.

    Good luck with everything and please post back with your thoughts on the suggestions you've received.
     
  4. kessie_giddens

    kessie_giddens
    uix_expand uix_collapse
    New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 13, 2010
    Messages:
    2
    Likes Received:
    0
    Thank you Sean and Fergal for the great advice. I feel a bit more at ease, now that I know there are others that feel as I do on this matter.

    I do intend on giving them ample time to fill my position. I figured talking to my boss at least two months before I leave would be ok. This would give her enough time to find someone, interview candidates and time to train.

    The funny thing is that the training dates have been skewed. The company we are purchasing from has had an overwhelming response and they are running out of training dates. In short, we are sending a few others before me, which pushes my time down to the late summer/fall. This, of course, does not get me off the hook, but it gives me time to let my boss know of my plans.
    Thank you both for your insight.
     
  5. Fergal

    Fergal
    uix_expand uix_collapse
    Premium Member
    Premium Member

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2007
    Messages:
    10,578
    Likes Received:
    1,163
    Thanks for posting back kessie_giddens. I'm happy to hear that you are feeling better about everything now. Please feel to join our discussions and share your knowledge and experience, to help our other members with their questions and concerns. Also, please feel free to post back if you have any further questions or would like feedback / suggestions on anything else.
     
  6. johndale

    johndale
    uix_expand uix_collapse
    Member

    Joined:
    Nov 12, 2009
    Messages:
    200
    Likes Received:
    0
    I have related issues for that matter. It's really hard that our managers, has a lot of high hopes for us. But it's always good to be true and always accompany saying polite words. It will also make you look professional. ;)
     

Share This Page