difference between sales and marketing.

Discussion in 'Internet Marketing' started by exportuscar123, Jul 24, 2010.

  1. exportuscar123

    exportuscar123
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    i want to know difference between sales and marketing.
     
  2. BizDoc

    BizDoc
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    Hi,

    Essentially, marketing is the process to develop and deliver your product to your customer. Sales is taking your product to your customer. If you consider it in the analogy of a mining operation and the mine is the marketplace, the guy in the mine deciding where to dig is the marketer and the fellow swinging the pickax is the salesman.

    Many people get the two confused so you're in good company. I define marketing on my blog in detail at bizmd.blogspot.com/2010/07/simple-marketing-pt-one.html as well as provide practical free advice to help you boost your profitability.

    Hope this helps. And check out the blog at bizmd.blogspot.com. It's 100% free and all I ask is to tell others if you find the content useful.

    Cheers!
     
  3. Alexishost

    Alexishost
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    the difference?
    as far as my understanding running my business,
    Marketing is everything that you do to reach and persuade prospects.

    While The sales is process or everything that you do to close the sale and get a signed agreement or contract :)
     
  4. Fergal

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    I know it's not a popular belief, but in my opinion the difference is overrated. To me, they are both fundamentally about increasing revenue and profitability. A good sales person will have an interest in aspects of the business such as design, positioning and market segmentation. A good marketing person will have a keen interest in sales prospecting and how sales are closed.

    It's my view that when a business over emphasises the differences between sales and marketing, this can cause a division in the company that will ultimately damage sales. Unfortunately some marketing people have an air of feeling that they are above sales and that selling is beneath them, again I feel that this is damaging to the business and probably also damaging to their individual careers.
     
  5. BizDoc

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    Fergal, I've seen many companies fall victim to the elite syndrome - marketing feeling they're above sales; sales feeling they're the real workers while marketing sits inside and takes credit for their successes... while I wouldn't necessarily think the difference is overrated, I do think too many companies don't understand how much synergy they can generate by allowing them to understand each other's processes.

    JMHO,
    Cheers!
     
  6. Tecknowoman

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    I tend to agree with Fergal one without the other just doesn't work. If you don't have marketing to catch the attention of prospects you can't draw them into the sales funnel and if you don't have sales all those good prospects are lost.
    There needs to be a synergy and the team needs to work together or everyone loses.
     
  7. bensh06

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    marketing is everything you do in your business like advertising, business plans, improvements and so on and so forth so that you will be able to make a sale or sales. This is just my understanding.
     
  8. humberto913

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    The main aim of Marketing is to consumer satisfaction on the otherhand earn maximum profit is the main aim of saling....
     
  9. ProfitClinic

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    Is it Marketing? Or is it Selling? And can YOU tell them apart?

    G'day gang :)

    I've spent roughly equal time in both marketing and selling over the past 40+ years. Here's what I've learned -- and teach (in marketing, advertising and MBA programs as well as in small business workshops):

    Marketing, Selling and Advertising

    • Why they’re not the same
    • Why you need all three. (Especially on-line.)

    Most website owners have a very hazy idea of the relationships between marketing, selling and advertising. Are they really different? Don't they all do much the same thing?

    The short answer is yes, they’re different, and no, they don’t all do much the same thing, except when people confuse them. Then they don’t do much of anything, except waste lots of money, time, effort and emotion.

    Sure, they’re all ultimately focused on a common objective, but each plays its own part in producing that result. Here, in a nutshell, are the essential differences between them and how each relates to the others. (Please note that this is an explanation — not a tutorial about how to make them work.)

    By the way, you can download two free Insight Reports on this very subject from here.

    Marketing

    The traditional definition of marketing is “identify a need and satisfy that need.” It involves seven essential components:

    1. Market research — identifying peoples’ needs, attitudes (emotional responses) and locations, and how best to reach them.

    2. Product Research and Development — creating the products or services that will satisfy the marketplace’s needs.

    3. Testing — This involves testing everything about the process, from the research results, the products and services, the pricing, distribution, sales and PR strategies and systems.

    4. Distribution — how to bring the product/service and the consumer together at the same time and place.

    5. Pricing — ensuring that you trade profitably, taking all costs and on-costs into account.

    6. Selling — How you get consumers to actually buy your products and services.

    7. Public Relations — Perhaps the most misunderstood of all components of the marketing mix. Public relations is not about selling your products and services. It’s about protecting your continuing right to do business in your community, however local or global that community may be.

    Selling

    As we’ve just seen, selling is only one of seven components in the overall marketing mix. But it's absolutely crucial for one very simple reason: no matter how much people need what we’re offering, until they want it, they won’t buy it! In other words, selling is really nothing more than getting people to want what they need.

    There are only three ways to sell:

    1. Advertising — which pulls the consumer towards whatever you’re offering (the benefits of your products and services)

    2. Visual Merchandising — which pushes what you’re offering toward those (hopefully) rapidly approaching consumers.

    3. Personal Selling Skills — which close any gap left by the first two.

    It’s just like a funnel…

    • Advertising – when done well – brings in large numbers of prospects at the top. It has the highest leverage because it can reach the most people.
    • Visual Merchandising is the part of the funnel that moves the prospect through the filter.
    • Personal Selling Skills focus on the highly qualified prospects that emerge from the process.

    Personal Selling Skills have the lowest leverage because they reach so few people. Yet we rely heavily — and at enormous cost in salaries, commissions, vehicle expenses, support services, resources, training, etc — on Personal Selling Skills because the first two, especially advertising, usually fail so miserably.

    Advertising

    So advertising is the highest leverage of the three selling methods (potentially, at least). But, because we confuse it with public relations, selling and marketing, instead of them working together synergistically to produce exponentially greater results than any of them could produce on their own, we end up with a murky mish-mash of the lot that barely covers its high costs — if we’re lucky!

    They’re all different, but closely related.

    • Advertising is a function of the selling process.
    • Selling is a function of the marketing process.
    • Public Relations is also a function of the marketing process, separate from selling and advertising.

    Get these differences and the connecting relationships clear in your mind and you can begin to increase their individual and combined power in your business.

    How does this relate to Internet Marketing, Selling and Advertising?

    Your website can be a powerful amalgam of ALL these functions…

    • It can be a product in its own right (providing valuable information or a service).
    • It can be a form of advertising by pulling consumers toward the benefits you offer.
    • It can be a form of visual merchandising by pushing the benefits toward the consumer.
    • It can be a form of personal selling skills by closing any gap left by your advertising and visual merchandising functions and taking orders on site.
    • It can be a form of public relations by protecting your right to do business online and offline.

    Whatever combination of these activities your website may include, don’t lose sight of the differences in these functions. While the Net offers unique ways to combine them, the fundamentals remain unchanged.

    Plan carefully, then implement your web strategy so that these functions are integrated, not fighting each other or confusing your audience. The Internet is a fantastic way of doing business, but the essentials of doing business properly haven’t really changed.

    Hope this helps.

    John
     
  10. WebWizard

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    Marketing is only effective if it targets the proper audience. Mainly working on promotional concepts/campaigns is a better approach, simply becasue you are targeting a specific group of potential clients that your looking to direct into doing business with your Service / Product.

    Promotions with speacial offers, such as Introductory or Exclusive rates gives a huge response due to the oppurtunity of the small crowd being able to push foward in a limited amount of time without the standard overhead.
     
  11. ProfitClinic

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    Sounds like you're suggesting that the shotgun approach is preferable to the sniper approach. Incredibly wasteful for most businesses. And expensive.

    Better to do the research, identify the specific needs (needs are what define markets) then target those markets.

    Doing promotional campaigns in order to find markets is a very expensive way to do research. It puts the cart before the horse... then you wonder why you go out backward!

    It's interesting. Almost all of the posts on this and other forums are made by sellers, not marketers. Marketers are invisible. Almost nobody meets a marketer face-to-face. They meet sellers.

    Marketers are backroom strategists and researchers, planners and statisticians. They're a relatively new breed, since the 1950s and 60s. (Before World War II marketing was classed as a division of economics.)

    Sellers have been around since forever. Selling is the world's oldest profession (yes, even older than THAT "world's oldest profession", because someone first had to make the sale, right?) So they've had to learn on the job. There are no university degrees in selling. It's a hands-on, stressful, highly-emotional gig where it's typically kill-or-be-killed.

    The most incisive analogy comparing the two professions (marketing and selling) is this:

    In duck season, the marketer knows where the ducks are, and which breeds. They know when they'll be in the air and what equipment and resources are needed. They know which decoys work best. They know how to get the ducks airborne, they load the guns, aim and fire. Then they send the sellers to fetch the wounded ducks. (The dead ones aren't going anywhere.)

    Fanciful, but there's a lot of overlap in real life. Still, when marketing and sales both do their jobs in real collaboration, the results can be astounding.

    There's no emotional dimension to marketing. It's rational, objective, analytical and cold. It's all about identifying and satisfying needs.

    On the other hand, selling is almost pure emotion... all about hopes, wants, desires, expectations and dreams, then fulfilling them or, even better, exceeding them.

    In selling, nobody wants your product. They don't even want the benefits of your product in most cases. What they really want is how it makes them FEEL... or, sometimes more to the point, how it makes everyone else feel!

    Hey... nobody NEEDS a Lamborghini. :D

    My old mate Rob Frankel, author of "The Revenge of Brand X", has a neat way of telling whether an organization has a clue about marketing: if anyone in the outfit has a business card or door plaque that says "Sales & Marketing", you can be 100% certain that the company is clueless when it comes to marketing.

    Hint: Copywriters and Art Directors are involved in Advertising. Advertising is (at least in theory) the highest-leverage form of SELLING. Heck, they even claim that "copywriting is salesmanship in print". Very few that I've ever met or trained or worked with "get" marketing at all.

    Too much emotion, really. It gets in the way of understanding.

    John
     
  12. Fergal

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    Thanks for the excellent explanations on the differences between sales, marketing and advertising John. That's probably the most detailed and helpful discussion on the subject, that I've ever read. Many people, including myself, don't give the very first element of marketing the attention it needs, when setting up a new business or launching a new product / service.

     
  13. Klaus

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    Difference between sales and marketing?

    I am shocked at the weakness of understanding and lack of clarity here.

    It's important to know the difference. It will directly impact your strategy and targeting.

    Here is a better explanation:

    http://www.clickok.org/Sales and Marketing.pdf
     
  14. ProfitClinic

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    Klaus,

    The document you linked to is classic traditional thinking on marketing, which is a very limited definition that hog-ties effective results and too often leads to the creation of such questionable devices as "ethical bribes" and "loyalty" programs.

    I find it bizarre that nobody questions the idea of loyalty being the result of bribery. That's like hiring mercenaries to staff a nation's army, then wondering why they take over the country.

    To often these are tacked onto the incomplete end of the process in the hope of extending the logical benefits that otherwise don't happen. And all because of the restrictive nature of traditional definitions of "marketing".

    On the other hand, this kind of thinking is fairly typical of marketing as perceived by sellers. As I mentioned earlier, Rob Frankel gets it pretty right: the best way to know if an organization understands marketing, not just "marketing is a better word for selling", is to see whether someone wears the hat "Sales & Marketing".

    Odd that that's the first phrase in the title of the paper you link to.

    John
     
  15. bmk

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    hay

    :D
    Marketing is related to the
    Product development,Placement,promotion,Price and sales are used to push the product in the market all the products are not required psuh but some have the requirment
     
  16. Klaus

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    John,

    It has become classic because it is a useful way to analyze and optimize.

    Use a classic value chain and there it is, tagged on the right side. There is flow from left to right, and the job of S&M is to open the gateway and trigger a large a flow as is possible.

    You then expand out the S&M segment and use other frameworks specific to both Sales and Marketing.

    This is how they teach you to do it at Harvard, LBS et al. This is how multibillion-dollar strategies are built. These concepts are used successfully by Intel, Apple et al.

    I actually think that your perception is limited. I expect more from someone with “40+ years experience.” For example, your “Marketing, Selling and Advertising” is very simple and derivative, with no sense of context. And therefore confusing to newbies who do not know how to apply context.

    Easy.

    Come on, all you're doing here is using the 4P. It's not even the modern 7P model. Very one-dimensional.

    Very poor. Put it in context and use modern models (VC, STP, 4th Level, Brand, Positioning etc).
     
  17. ProfitClinic

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    Klaus, you're missing the point: this isn't a forum for professional marketers. It's essentially for people who are new to online business. That's the audience I write for here.

    I conduct online workshops where the kinds of topics you mention are covered in more depth, in practical context, where there's time and space in which points can be made, not simply scored.

    John
     
  18. rapidbilling

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    hey, :dunno: what is this?

    you don't know the difference between sales and marketing.
    In simple language we can say, in marketing you are making your target customer aware about your product or service. Fillip Kotler defines marketing as satisfying needs and wants of your customer through an exchange process.

    while in sale you are selling your product or service to your customer and get money in return of it means The exchange of goods or services for an amount of money or its equivalent; the act of selling. You have the knowledge about this.:eyebrow:
     
  19. Klaus

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    @John / Profit Clinic,
    Sorry about that. I wasn't trying to score points. I looked at my langauge and it does seem a bit terse. I think I was having a bad day.

    Anyway, here's a link that puts it in context (I gave the guy the topic and he thought it would be a good one for a short youtube):
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qriRLBSN0fo

    Easy.
     
  20. ProfitClinic

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    @Klaus,

    Yep, know bad days only too well. We all have them.

    I watched the video and, while it's informative, I suspect that the online marketer with little or no marketing (or even business) experience would find it confusing and intimidating.

    My observation and experience over the past 14 years online has led me to these general conclusions (in no particular order), confirmed by forum discussions, webinars and surveys we've done over the years -- and by a high proportion of the posts on this and other forums for this audience:

    • Most small business owners confuse marketing with selling because most of what they hear and see about marketing comes from sellers, not marketers. (They rarely have contact with marketers. They have constant contact with sellers -- especially sellers who hijack marketing terminology and assign it their own selling interpretations.)
    • Most small business owners seem to think that marketing is basically just market communications. While this is a vital aspect (and again, the visible end of the marketing process), it's only one of seven or eight components in the overall marketing mix.

    John
     

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