Confused on what degree to get....

Discussion in 'Self Improvement and Being Successful' started by josephsauerland, Jan 12, 2013.

  1. josephsauerland

    josephsauerland
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    I had a general question. I'm considering studying in Norway. I've heard many things about Business Administration being a bad course of study, due to the fact that no one is looking for someone with a degree in business management. I am as of yet unsure of specifically what I want to study and get a degree in, but I have a general field.
    I am interested in Economics, and finance (such as banking, managing a business's finances, accounting, etc), but I'm also interested in business, but I don't want a degree in something that will not enable me to find employment. I've heard of people getting an MBA and having to work at McDonalds due to there being no employment. I asked my advisors at my college, but they all were clueless and had no idea. Of course, anyone at a college however would say you'd find jobs. They want to sell you a degree! I just want the honest truth on this.


    So I was wondering if you could help me answer this question, of what degree would be best for employment. I'm seeking to work internationally, maybe in Austria, Switzerland, or even in Norway, but I honestly don't know what degree would ensure employment in those places. I do not want to get a Master's degree in Business Administration only to discover that I could not find any employment. If you could help me with this guidance, I would be very much appreciative. Thanks!

    Thanks, Joseph Sauerland
     
  2. Fergal

    Fergal
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    Welcome to Business Advice Forum Joseph!

    Of the degrees you are considering which one do you think you would enjoy studying for most? If I was you I would give more thought to that, than to which one is more likely to get you a job. Reason: the more you enjoy your degree studies, the more involved you will be in your course, the more motivated you will be and the better you will do. Hence, the degree that you would enjoy most, is actually most probably the degree that would be most helpful for you when it comes to getting a job.

    Does that help?
     
  3. sigma

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    Well, degree is not the only factor for you to get the job. Yes, there is a MBA holder working at Mcdonalds but there are many MBA holder is work on better place. Education background can help you to get better job but not 100%, there are many factor is under consideration. if you ask me, i will definitely suggest you choose the course you like, nobody know what will going on in future and what is the market demand for that field. Choose what you like unless you wouldnt regret
     
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  4. Ted

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    You stated that you are interested in Economics, Banking and Finance. I would presume that all of those countries you mentioned would have opportunities to work in those fields. They all have banks. Don't they? The people in those countries all need financial advice. Don't they? I believe banking is very popular in Switzerland in particular.

    As far as the MBA is concerned, I believe you are correct. The job prospects, at least here in the US are bad for MBA's unless you graduate at the top of your class. I have a very close friend who is a Dean at a major US university. She told me last summer that they are trying to get more students to choose other paths besides getting a degree in Business Administration. She says that there is simply too much supply and not enough demand for general business graduates. They have a really hard time finding work in their field. It makes sense too. You only need so many managers.

    I studied computer science in college. If I could go back and do it over, I would have studied economics. Maybe that will give you something to think about.
     
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  5. Fergal

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    I studied management and marketing in college. If I could do it over again I would study Computer Science :)
     
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  6. josephsauerland

    josephsauerland
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    The problem with college degrees these days is that the colleges don't really give its students anything to think about. I have a very high interest in finance, and the economy, but I have absolutely no idea what someone with a degree in "Economics" even does. I know that if I had a degree in Finance, I could be a bank teller or work in a bank giving people financial advice, but what past that? What else could I do? It's just very unclear to me what many of these degrees do....

    I could also Major in Economics or Finance, with a minor in International Business. I'm planning on learning German and Norwegian, as well, so I'll be trilingual. My ideal job would be working at a large company, possibly doing financial advising for them, or something along those lines. It's hard to imagine what I'll be doing, because I just don't get what they do.
     
  7. Ted

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    I guess the grass is always greener....lol

    I am glad I got my education in computer science. However, my passion is more for economics. I find it fascinating. I took a couple of basic economics classes in college, (a basic Macroeconomics and a basic Microeconomics) I aced them both and loved the classes. I think I was like one of two kids in the class that actually listened to the professor's lectures and fully engaged with him. It still fascinates me to see how people take complex social issues and build mathematical formulas to explain how they work.

    I have fond memories of those economics classes. I argued with my economics professors often trying to prove to them that they were wrong. They were strong believers in Keynesian economics almost as if it was their religion. I tried to point out flaws in the Keynesian economic model. Although I don't think I ever won any arguments with them, I do recall stumping one of them one time. I asked him a question he could not come up with an answer to. I don't know if he was truly perplexed by the question or if he just wanted to hit me. Either is possible.
     
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  8. Fergal

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    Very true! Thankfully there are lots of opportunities for lifelong learning nowadays and there are lots of options to study almost any subject via a part time course or distance learning. I recently completed a one year diploma course in Computer Science and am currently teaching myself PHP in my spare time.
     
  9. MeanBossLady

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    Sorry about jacking this thread, but this very thread has my questioning my college path! I'm going in for business management! Maybe I should go in for entrepreneurship instead?? From my most recent thread, it seems like it would be better for me?
     
  10. Fergal

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    You could contact colleges offering those degrees and ask them the question. Also ask them for some examples of what their previous graduates in that subject are currently doing career wise.

    A degree can be a good starting point for your career and is a good way to get in the door. However, it doesn't guarantee you anything and it doesn't have to limit you in any way either. If you started working in a bank with a degree in Economics, and are good at your job you could potentially branch into lots of different areas within the bank and progress up through the ranks.

    You will probably get a better response MeanBossLady, if you start a new thread for your question. However, I would give you the same advice that I gave to Joseph:
     

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